Hardwood – 9 Dangers of Acquiring Hardwood From a Big Box Chain Store

If you are looking for hardwood, then you know this is a very important investment you are going to be making. Read this report on the dangers of acquiring hardwood from a big box chain store before you start your search for the perfect store!
A “Big Box” store refers to the mega stores such as Home Depot and Lowe’s. They are popular with flooring customers because they have convenient hours considering they are open seven days a week and evenings, they have competitive pricing due to their high sales volume, and they have a good selection of low- to mid-quality hard surface products and carpeting in stock since higher quality products can be special ordered.
Flooring is a long-term investment that can increase the value of your home if it is purchased and installed correctly. If not, however, it can lower the value of your home. Imagine a home with cracked tile, warped wood floors, or carpet lifting at the is not admirable. Here are nine downfalls you need to be mindful of before buying floor covering from a Big Box store:
Pitfall #1
The Do-it-Yourself (DIY) community is who the Big Box stores are in business to help. If you have the skill, time, special tools, training, design background, and patience to do it yourself, a Big Box store is a good place to buy flooring products. Shopping for floor covering at a Big Box store will cause frustration if you do not fit the handyman category, or if you don’t have enough time or patience to do it yourself.
Pitfall #2
With Big Box stores, you waste too much valuable time. Their carpeting or hardwood sections may be disorganized, messy, cramped, and not well merchandised, making it hard for you to find what you need. It also means you will be obliged to make repeat visits for the smallest things.
Pitfall #3
Big Box stores mean no in-house designers. There is no professional help selecting the right products and combinations for your needs and flooring area. This makes your job much harder and takes you much longer to complete your project from the get-go.
Pitfall #4
Big Box store employees receive little or no instruction. These stores are not dedicated flooring experts and the employees often can not answer your simplest questions.
Pitfall #5
These stores will up-sell you. It’s natural for these stores to promote low cost, loss leader floor covering to get you in the door. However, when you arrive at the store, the advertised flooring products are either sold out, or there aren’t enough for your project. That’s when the Big Box stores will up-sell you on the more expensive products, even if they aren’t suitable for you.
Pitfall #6
These stores will also attempt to pile up undesirable or discontinued products on you. Contracts put Big Box chain stores under heavy sales pressure to sell inventory from certain manufacturers. This is not good news because they will put the pressure on you to buy hardwood or other types of flooring that may not be appropriate for your needs.
Pitfall #7
The products that are in stock tend to be on the low end of the quality spectrum. Because your floors are the second most abused part of your home (after the roof), it is not in your benefit to choose among the low-end flooring products.
Pitfall #8
Big Box stores usually have a long waiting period for installation. Their business isn’t installing flooring, so you might have to do this yourself, which causes you more problems.
Pitfall #9
These Big Box stores are not structured to offer quality floor covering service. Hardwood, as well as any other flooring, is an investment and choosing the appropriate products and properly installing them is critical to your flooring’s function, aesthetics, and durability.
If you aren’t a handyman, builder, contractor, or don’t have spare time to do your flooring project on your own, a Big Box store is not a good choice to purchase hardwood.

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